An Uncle Vanya That Captures Pain and Pleasure

DAVID FLORES IS A POWERFUL UNCLE VANYA AT OFF THE WALL THEATRE
RANDALL T. ANDERSON AND ALICIA RICE IN UNCLE VANYA AT OFF THE WALL THEATRE

One of the most popular of ethnic stereotypes is that of the morose Russian and in a new production of “Uncle Vanya” we see the full breadth and power of that belief.

Based on several translations of the Chekhov play, Dale Gitzman has adapted the play into a parade of misery and sullen emotional little bombs.

Mr. Gutzman knows as much about staging and theatricality as anyone in this city and he pulls out all the stops in this production. With moments that range from melancholic paralysis to fearsome and tempestuous moments of fierce anger this show is a riveting roller coaster of human frailty.

Mr. Gutzman has assembled a cast led by outstanding and memorable performances from David Flores and Alicia Rice. 

Mr. Flores who has built a full and scintillating resume over decades is Vanya and his vast range is on clear display. He’s bored, sad, joyous, lustful, disappointed, pained, cruel and passionately outraged. His scene with Mr. Gutzman is absolutely chilling and incredibly commanding of attention. 

Ms. Rice is an actor seen far too seldom on city stages. The last time I saw here was as the title character in Bonny Anne Bonny, a Theatre Red co-production with Wisconsin Lutheran College. It was a role that demanded incredible physical ability as well as acting chops. She took a role that was hard to define and gave it a precision that was both thoughtful and defined.

In this one she faced a number of choices as Elena, the  young wife of Mr. Gutzman’s elderly professor. Two men, Vanya and Dr. Astrov (Randall T Anderson) are both in hopefully in love with Elena.

Traditionally actors who have played Elena are tempted by sluttty overacting. The character can easily be an off duty porn actress.

But Ms. Rice achieves a profound balance between a temptress, a bored housewife and a woman who hungers for another life, even though she is uncertain what that life could, and should, be. Her performance is one of the best I’ve ever seen at Off The Wall. 

Jenny Kosek plays Sonya, the daughter of the professor, who is a plain young woman hopelessly and secretly in love with Dr. Astrov. She is painful to watch, suffering both from a harsh self-image and the heartache of her silent love affair. Ms. Kosek wonderful quiet presence on the tiny stage on Wells St. 

That small stage, sandwiched between two sections of seat sections, is one of the issues Mr. Anderson struggles with.

He clearly has a grasp of his character but has a stagnant facial expression, always the same semi-grimace, no matter the emotion. He needs some serious direction on how to convey emotion physically, as well as with his voice. 

Mr. Gutzman has directed a production that is a Chekhov masterpiece about the futilities of life and the inability of these people to  either change their circumstances or cope with the reality of their lives. It’s a story filled with lots of agony mixed with a bit of ecstasy and it’s as thoughtful and visceral as anything I’ve ever seen at Off The Wall.

Cast: Vanya, David Flores; Maria, Christine Horgen; So0nya Jenny Kosek; Professor Alexander, Dale Gutzman; Elena, Alicia Rice; Astrov Randall T. Anderson; Nanny Barbara Weber; Telegin, Larry J. Lukasavage. 

Production credits: Director, Dale Gutzman; Technical Director; David Roper; Lighting, John R. Dolphin and David Roper; Assistant to Mr. Gutzman, Sandy Lewis.

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