Nothing but laughs as Chamber kicks off season with a classic farce

Tim Higgens and Rachel Zientek are stunned by the arrival of Rick Pendzich in Unnecessary Farce at Milwaukee Chamber Theatre. Photo by Paul Ruffalo

Talk about a perfect confluence of events!

Here we all are in the midst of these trying times. Summer is ending and school is starting. We are being deluged and threatened by a tsunami of electric scooters all over the city. Donald Trump is still president. 

What we need is a good laugh and delivering just what we need is Milwaukee Chamber Theater, kicking off the season with a breathlessly hilarious production of “Unnecessary Farce.”

With a sparkling cast under the direction of Ryan Schabach, the laughs come early and never stop in this production of the play by Paul Williams Smith that’s been produced all over the world. 

You know this is supposed to be fun with the first glance at the set by Martin McClenmdon. It’s two adjacent modest rooms in the Sheboyg-Inn Motel.  Get it?

The lights go down and Eric (Ben Yela) comes into one room in his underwear. Eric makes a call to “the chief,” getting twisted in the phone cord which tangles under his shirt as he dresses. More laughs, and we are on our way. 

Mr. Yela is one of two bumbling cops – Billie, (a once-again brilliant Rachel Zientek) – who have been assigned to eavesdrop on the next room in order to catch the mayor in a $16 million embezzlement scheme. 

Themayor, Jonathan Gillard Daly, is scheduled to meet in the adjacent room with accountant Karen Brown (Amber Smith) and admit the embezzlement. There is a camera in the room and a monitor in the cop’s room and, like any great farce, relationships are at the heart of things.

Eric and Karen, who are part of the trap as a lure to get the mayor to confess,  spent the night together, but nothing happened. The first moments together in the morning are all business before they clinch into passionate kissing. 

Karen: I can’t believe this.
Eric: I know.
Karen: I can’t believe we spent the whole night…
Eric: Talking/
Karen: And talking.
Eric: Aimlessly flirting.
Karen: You weren’t flirting. You gave no indication you were flirting.
Eric: I was talking. For me that is flirting.
Karen: I was unbuttoning my blouse. You didn’t know that was a signal?
Eric: I thought you were warm.
Karen: I was lying on my bed. Unbuttoning my blouse.
Eric: I thought you were sleepy and warm.
Karen: I wanted to…
Eric: Well, I wanted to too.
Karen: Then why didn’t you…
Eric: I didn’t know you wanted to.
Karen: And by the time we….
Eric: Kissed.
Karen: The alarm clock went off and…
Eric: I know.
Karen: We had to stop. We had to get dressed.
Eric: I know.
Karen: Before we ever got undressed. Before we….
Eric: I know.
Karen: GOD!
Eric: Well I guess there’s something to be said for not rushing things.
Karen; Rushing Things? I’m thirty five years old, Eric. I’m an accountant. Who works with other accountants. You’re the first man I’ve met in ten years who didn’t ask me for my number rounded to the nearest integer. And you’re sweet. And you’re sexy. And…God!

The mayor arrives along with his security guard Agent Frank (Tim Higgins) and Mr. Daly delivers the befuddled executive he always does so well. I was reminded of his classic Elwood P. Dowd in The Rep’s “Harvey” five years ago. 

What develops before we know it is a tangled tale of lovers, would be lovers, a Mafia from Scotland (the Clan with a C), panic,  hiding behind doors, getting hit in the face with doors, lost clothes, sexual desire and denial, surprising entanglements, the wife of the mayor (Jenny Wanasek) who has a secret occupation and a Scottish hitman named Todd (Rick Pendzich).

Mr. Pendzich is one of the most accomplished comedic actors in the city and he only enhances his reputation with this one.

Dressed in his kilt and giant plumed cap, he takes evil and turns it into a joyous character who seems to draw laughs every time he opens his mouth. He has a thick Scottish brogue and when anger grips this killer, his brogue mutates into an indecipherable Scottish babble understood by nobody but him.

Ms. Zientek, who is growing before our very eyes, steals much of the show with her confused and confusing cop. Her maneuvering around the hotel room, bound and gagged by Todd, is a prolonged display of brilliant physical comedy.

And she proves she is no slouch in the comedic dialogue department with her rapid fire translation of a rant by Todd, a translation that was so funny and striking that it drew applause from the audience. 

Mr. Schabach is a young director and his work in this, the broadest of comedies, stamps him as one to keep an eye on. 

Chamber is the traditional start of the theater season in Milwaukee and this production has set a high bar for the rest of the year. Match the joy of this one and audiences will be in for a long year of joy and satisfaction. 

Production Credits: Director: Ryan Schabach; Production Stage Manager, Judy Martel; Scenic Designer, Martin McClendon; CostumeDesigner, Aliceson Hackett-Rubel; Lighting Designer, David Gipson; Sound Designer, David Cecsarini; Propmaster, Moira Tracey; Fight Consultant/Intimacy Coordinator; Christopher Elst; Production Manager Colun Gawronski; Dialect Coach, Raeleen McMillion. 

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